Kids These Days Feel Entitled

High school teacher here, if you didn’t already know.

So I know what I’m talking about when I say kids these days feel entitled. They feel entitled in ways those of us coming up in the seventies, eighties, and nineties did not.

Kids these days feel soooooooooo entitled. I didn’t feel as entitled as they do when I was their age.

My generation rolled with the punches and didn’t make waves. We worked hard and hoped for the best. This bent towards working hard and making do is a hallmark of so-called Generation X. We’re proud of it.

Kids these days feel entitled to too much. They want to be taken care of. They think they’re special.

Not me. When there was a gunman in the neighborhood and I had to go on lockdown in a flimsy-walled trailer classroom for an hour with thirty students who were scared and sad and had to go to the bathroom, I didn’t complain to my representative and ask for gun control. I was just grateful for the job. We all survived, didn’t we? I went back to work the next day like nothing happened.

When a beloved former student of mine was killed in an act of gun violence last summer, I attended a candlelit vigil and I wept.

I embraced his parents and I prayed for them.

I didn’t march to protest the lack of gun control in this country.

I didn’t go on CNN and call out any NRA-backed politicians for their greed.

I didn’t feel entitled to safe spaces to work and live for myself or for others in my city.

Worse than that, I didn’t feel entitled enough for my own daughters to have a safe space to go to school to disrupt the status quo of gun madness in this country.

The Parkland, Florida students and young people all over America are rising up and being rude and downright aggressive in the face of the greed, ignorance and avarice of the gun lobby and their puppets in government. These kids with their sense of entitlement to live have done more for freedom and justice in this country than I have in an entire Generation X lifetime of keeping my head down and working hard.

Thank God for the entitlement of the rising generation. They’re saving us all.

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We better keep up with them.






  1. Thank you Maureen. I am so grateful that our kids feel empowered and angry. I am so happy, yes, happy, that they want to be the difference. They don’t blame us, who kept our heads down. But they see the need to fight back. They see the need to resist the past in order to live a better future. I am so proud of our kids.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I attended high school in the ’60’s, and yes, we felt entitled. We felt entitled because of things our teachers, parents, and activist said. We believed that equality made it possible for us to learn, do, and enter careers where the doors were once closed. Girls were no longer limited to careers as teachers or nurses. We could be lawyers, doctors, and yes, even politicians. We could protest not only for equal rights, but to stop the Viet Nam war. We could lobby to lower the voting age to 18 since our government drafted men of that age.

    But then, America demonstrated that those so entitled would be defamed; wrongfully accused of crime; arrested and yes, even murdered under color of official right. Our heroes of the ’60’s were murdered, and our hero entertainers overdosed or died in plane or car crashes. Subtly, our government conveyed to future generations that to speak up meant to end up 6ft under.

    We’ve come again to the beginning of the Age of Aquarius. This young generation has learned; they have toughened; and they are unstoppable.


  3. Marcus Salm

    Excellent article Maureen. The student who challenged Sen Marco Rubio about accepting funds from the NRA was certainly entitled. M & M Salm


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